Interview: State’s Responsibility in Keeping People Healthy from Environmental Factors

Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s dean of global health is urging New York lawmakers to consider the connection between the environment and public health when it comes to allocating resources. Dr. Philip Landrigan is an expert on environmental threats to children’s health. He joined us to talk more about the role the state can play in keeping kids healthy. Click here for interview.

landrigan-interview

Philip Landrigan interview on Capital Pressroom Radio Show

Dr. Philip Landrigan, M.D., the Dean for Global Health and a professor of Preventive Medicine and Pediatrics at Mount Sinai Hospital, makes the case for state funding of Centers for Environmental Health, and explains his push for labeling GMO foods.

Audio_IconListen Here. His interview starts at 22:28.

 

 

Finger Lakes Children’s Environmental Health Center

Environmental health hazards include physical hazards and toxic substances that may enter our bodies through air, food, or water. They can have many negative effects on physical, mental, and emotional health. These effects can include:

  • Physical illness
  • Long lasting injury
  • Mental damage
  • Fertility problems
  • Miscarriages
  • Birth defects
  • Cancer

Some environmental health hazards can cause effects soon after exposure, while others may not cause effects for many years. Being aware of these hazards and taking action to avoid them contributes to a lifetime of well-being.

The Finger Lakes Children’s Environmental Health Center (FLCEHC) center serves all who are considering pregnancy or who are already pregnant or breastfeeding. Environmental exposures affect the mother and also can pass from her body to the baby through the placenta or breast milk These exposures can affect the baby’s growth and development. Breastfeeding is beneficial for both mother and baby so reducing exposure to environmental contaminants is important for long term health.

We serve children because they are at high risk for the effects of environmental exposure. Their brains and bodies are still developing, their hand-to-mouth behavior increases likelihood of ingesting toxic substances,and they spend more time close to the ground where hazards are often found. Children can be exposed in the home, playing outside, or in other buildings like daycare or school.